< Englische Sprichwörter >

The soul would have no rainbow if the eyes didn't have tears.
Africa

The sound of leather on willow.

The sparrow says: "I have not eaten... so the parrot will not eat either."
Africa

The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.
Gospel of Matthew 26:41.

The spirits are the strength and counsel to the living.
Africa

The spring makes the stream flow.
Africa

The squaring of the circle.
widespread idiom
en] something impossible, a problem that seems to be unsolvable; a logically or intuitively hopeless task.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

The squirrel can beat the rabbit climbing a tree, but then the rabbit makes the best stew that sort of equalizes the thing.

The stage is a supplement to the pulpit, where virtue, according to Plato's sublime idea, moves our love and affection when made visible to the eye.
Disraeli

The start of weeping is always hard.
Africa

The stillest humours are always the worst.

The stomach listens to no precepts. It begs and clamors. And yet it is not an obdurate creditor. It is dismissed with a small payment, if only you give it what you owe, and not as much as you can.
Seneca

The Story Has Legs.

The straw that broke the camel's back.

The strength of a man can't be determined by is size.
Africa

The strength of the elderly is in the ears and on the lips.
Africa

The strength of the wolf is in the pack, the strength of the pack is in the wolf.
Africa

The strong will always rule, it's only a question of the content of the strength.
Africa

The strongest man on earth is he who stands alone.
Africa

The strongest person among men is not he who fights everyone but is he who controls is anger.
Africa

The stupid believe that to be truthful is easy; only the artist, the great artist, knows how difficult it is.
Willa Sibert Cather (1873 - 1947)

The success of a man is through the soles of his feet, that of a woman is from her legs.
Africa

The sun cannot be hidden by two fingers.

The sun shines during the day, not at night.
Africa

The sun shines on those who are standing before it shines on the people kneeling under them.
Africa

The sun should never set on our anger.

The sun will shine on those who are standing before it shines on those who are sitting.
Africa

The sweet flying ants will never be birds.
Africa

The sweetness of a kola nut doesn't lie in its sugar content.
Africa

The table robs more then the thief.

The tail is wagging the dog.

The tail wagging the dog.

The tast of the kitchin is better then the smell.

The teacher has not taught, until the student has learned.

The tears of a man flow into the stomach.
Africa

The teeth are smiling, but is the heart?
Africa

The teeth that cannot move in unison cannot bit a piece of meat.
Africa

The teeth that stink together are the ones to bite the meat.
Africa

The temperate are the most truly luxurious. By abstaining from most things, it is surprising how many things we enjoy.
Simms

The things that keep us down, and hinder our progress, are our appetites, passions, and desires.

The third degree.

The third times the charm.
en] After failing the first two times, success can be found on the third try.

The thorn comes forth with his point forwards.

The thought hath good legs, and the quill a good tongue.

The thread follows the needle.
Africa

The thrower of stones throws away the strength of his own arm.
Africa

The tide will fetch away what the ebb brings.

The tiger that prowls quietly doesn't mean it's intimidated.
Africa

The Time is Ripe.

The time to make friends is before you need them.
Africa

The time to slap a king is the time when a fly touches on his cheek.
Africa

The time you wake up is your morning.
Africa

The tip of the iceberg.
en] Just a small part of something much bigger.

The Tipping Point.

The toad that wanted to avoid the rain fell in the water.
Africa

The toast of the town.

The tongue breaketh bone, though it self have none.

The tongue can be so sweet but when the hands are too tough.
Africa

The tongue is not statically smooth.
Africa

The tongue talks at the heads cost.

The tongue weighs practically nothing, but so few people can hold it.
Africa

The tongue wounds more than a lance.

The tongue's not steel, yet it cuts.

The tooth is a fool because it smiles to whom it even dislikes.
Africa

The tortoise said it wants to box, but its hand is too short.
Africa

The total depravity of inanimate things.

The town bike.

The trap to the high born is ambition.

The tree breaks that takes all the force of the wind.
Africa

The tree that is not taller than you cannot shade you.
Africa

The tree will not sway without a trace of wind.

The triumph of hope over experience.

The true manhood or soul of man can never be destroyed; you may kill the body, but the soul you cannot kill.

The truest jests sound worst in guilty ears.

The truth is in the wine.

The truth shall set you free, or The truth will set you free.
John 8:32.

The truth will out.

The turtle does not suffer when running.
Africa

The two hardest things in life to handle are success and failure.
Africa

The unborn baby that fears criticism will never be born.
Africa

The ungrateful son is a wart on his father's face; to leave it is a blemish, to cut it off is pain.

The ungrateful son is like a wart on his father's face; to leave it there is unsightly, to cut it off is painful.

The unkindest cut of all.

The upper hand.

The usual suspects.

The venemous snake cannot be seen in the Savannah.
Africa

The very fact that we are looking for something usually stands in the way of our finding it.
Africa

The very time I thought I was lost, my dungeon shook and my chains fell off.

The viper assumes the colors of his surroundings.
Africa

The visitor who goes away without eating never comes back.
Africa

The voice of the people is the voice of god.

The voice of the people, the voice of God.

The voice that comes to borrow is more humble than the voice that comes to sake payment.
Africa

The voices of the ancestors are the voices of the gods.
Africa

The wages of sin is death.

The Walls Have Ears.

The warnings of age are the weapons of youth.

The water can only flow thanks to the well.
Africa

The water in your well can be very hot, but it will never cook your rice.
Africa

The way a cat walks is not the way it catches a rat.
Africa

The way to a man's heart is through his stomach.

The way to be cheerful - think of your blessines and other people's troubles while you are going through yours, and you will find that your blessings are greater than your cross. Keep hopeful, - the sun will shine, though now the way seems rough and dark.

The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the quality of the strong.
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

The wealth of the greedy ultimately goes to the community.
Africa

The weed that grows by the riverbank will not suffer the effect of draught.
Africa

The wheel turns.

The wheels have come off.

The whisper of a pretty girl can be heard further than the roar of a lion.

The whistle does not pull the train.

The whistle doesn't pull the train.

The white ant is small but it creates the great anthill.
Africa

The whole dignity of man lies in the power of thought.

The whole duty of man is embraced in the two principles of abstinence and patience: temperance in prosperity, and courage in adversity.
Seneca

The Whole Enchilada.

The whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

The whole kit and caboodle.

The whole nine yards.

The whole nine yards.
en] Everything that is available.

The whole shebang.

The whole shebang.
en] The entire thing.

The wholesomest meat is at another mans cost.

The wife is the key of the house.

The wind does not break a tree that can bend.
Africa

The wind has changed.
widespread idiom
en] the circumstances or conditions have changed.

The wind helps those without an axe to cut wood.
Africa

The wind that carried the mortar will not fail to carry the pestle.
Africa

The windy satisfaction of the tongue.
HOMER, Circa 850 b. c., Odyssey, Book IV, Line 1092

The Winter of Our Discontent.

The wisdom of nations lies in their proverbs.

The wise create proverbs for fools to learn, not to repeat.
Africa

The wise hand doth not all the foolish tongue speaketh.

The wise man is father of the fool.
Africa

The wise traveler leaves his heart at home.
Africa

The wish for prayer is a prayer in itself.
Georges Bernanos (1888 - 1948)

The wish is father to the thought.

The wish to pray is a prayer in itself.
Georges Bernanos (1888 - 1948)

The witness of a rat is another rat.
Africa

The wolf may lose his teeth but never his nature.

The womb is not a boat, it cannot carry as much as a boat.
Africa

The wood is burnt, but the ashes are a nuisance.

The word "yes" brings trouble; the word "no" leads to no evil.
Africa

The word fast, and phrases that derive from it.

The word fast, and phrases that derive from it..

The word spread.
en] The news spread ("the word" = some news).

The words of the elders do not lock all the doors, they leave the right door open.
Africa

The words of the wise become sweet the day after.
Africa

The words you say to tell the truth are as important as the decision to be truthful.
Africa

The world about us.
Africa

The world does not make promises to anybody.
Africa

The world has changed dramatically.
Africa

The world has not made a promise to anybody.
Africa

The world is one's lobster.

The world is one's oyster.

The world is sad enough without your woe,
Talk happiness and create sunshine here below.

The world is story.
Africa

The world is the traveler's inn.

The world is your oyster.

The world lives on hope.

The world will not find rest by just saying "peace."

The worm don't see nothing pretty in the robin's song.

The worm that exposes itself on the ground is waiting for a lucky bird to devour it.
Africa

The worst men often give the best advice.
Bailey

The worst of law is that one suit breeds twenty.

The worst person doesn't lack some good deeds.
Africa

The worst way to miss someone is to be sitting right beside them knowing you can't have them.

The worst you can do to truth is to cloth it in lies, you can't undo it.
Africa

The worth of a thing is what it will bring.

The wound of words is worse than the wound of swords.

The wound that bleeds inwardly is the most dangerous.

The wrath of brothers is fierce and devilish.

The wrath of Peleus' son, the direful spring
Of all the Grecian woes, O goddess, sing!
HOMER, Circa 850 b. c., Iliad, Book I, Line 1

The writing is on the wall.

The writings of thomas Paine.

The wrong end of the stick.

The wrong side of the blanket.

The wrongdoer forgets, but not the wronged.
Africa

The year dot.

The yellow dog is brother to the wolf.

The Yellow Peril.

The young are slaves to novelty, the old to custom.

The young man's wrath is like straw of fire,
But like red hot steel is the old man's ire.
Byron.

The young may die, the old must die.
Ger., Dutch.

The younger brother the better gentleman.

The youth of today and the youth of tomorrow will be accorded an almost unequaled opportunity for great accomplishment and for human service.
Nicholas Murray Butler (1862 - 1947)

The zebra told the white horse, "I am white," and told the black horse, "I am actually black."
Africa

The/a black list.
widespread idiom
en] a list of persons or things considered undesirable or deserving punishment.

The/a dead point (German: der tote Punkt/ein toter Punkt, cf. English: the dead center).
widespread idiom
en] a stage when no progress can be made; a state of greatest exhaustion or stagnancy; at a standstill.

The/a dead spot (German: der tote Punkt/ein toter Punkt, cf. English: the dead center).
widespread idiom
en] a stage when no progress can be made; a state of greatest exhaustion or stagnancy; at a standstill.

The/a glass ceiling.
widespread idiom
en] the invisible barrier formed y such things as attitudes and traditions which can prevent a woman, or, people from ethnic or religious minorities, from being promoted to the most important jobs.

The/a sacred cow.
widespread idiom
en] a belief, opinion or tradition that is untouchable, treated with much respect and usually may not be criticized.

Theatre versus Theater.
en] Confusing Words

Them that has gets.

Them that has, gets (more).

Them that has, gets more.

Them that has, gets.

Them what has gets.

Them what has, gets (more).

Them what has, gets more.

Them what has, gets.

Them's the breaks.

Themselves versus Theirselves.
en] Confusing Words

Then the ship perished, and of them that were in it not one survived. And I was cast on to an island by a wave of the sea.
ANCIENT EGYPT, The Story of the Shipwrecked Sailor, Circa 1700 b. c.?

Then versus Than.
en] Confusing Words

There a no one in this world can drag you down into degradation and dishonor and shame, except it be your own self.

There' a time and a place for everything.

There are bad apples in every orchard.

There are clouds on the horizon.

There are forty kinds of lunacy, but only one kind of common sense.
Africa

There are many colourful flowers on the path of life, but the prettiest have the sharpest thorns.
Africa

There are many rare abilities in the world that fortune never brings to light.

There are many ways to skin a cat.

There are more people abusive to others than lie open to abuse themselves; but the humor goes round, and he that laughs at me to-day will have somebody to laugh at him tomorrow.
Seneca

There are more threatned then struck.

There are more ways of killing a cat than choking it with cream.

There are no atheists in foxholes.

There are no greater prudes than those women who have their own dirty secrets to hide.

There are no short cuts to the top of a palm tree.
Africa

There are no small parts, only small actors.

There are no whole truths; all truths are half-truths. It is trying to treat them as whole truths that plays the devil.
Alfred North Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

There are no witnesses to a dream.
Africa

There are none so blind as they who will not see.

There are none so blind as those who will not see.

There are none so blind as those, that will not see.

There are only two classes in society: Those who get more than they earn, and those who earn more than they get.
Holbrook Jackson (1874 - 1948)

There are only two or three human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before.
Willa Sibert Cather (1873 - 1947)

There are other fish in the sea.

There are plenty more fish in the sea.

There are plenty of fish in the sea.

There are three friends in this world: courage, sense, and insight.
Africa

There are three kinds of lies....

There are three things that a man must know to survive in this world: what is too much for him, what is too little, and what is just right.
Africa

There are twenty-five uncaught sparrows for a penny.

There are two sides to every question.

There are two ways of making yourself stand out from the crowd. One is by having a job so big you can go home before the bell rings if you want to. The other is by finding so much to do that you must stay after the others have gone. The one who enjoys the former once took advantage of the latter.
Henry Ford (1863 - 1947)

There but for grace of God.

There but for the grace of God go I.

There but for the grace of God, go I.

There came nothing out of the sack but what was in it.

There could be no great ones if there were no little.

There is a certain artificial polish, a commonplace vivacity acquired by perpetually mingling in the beau monde, which, in the commerce of the world, supplies the place of natural suavity and good-humor, but is purchased the expense of all original and sterling traits character.
Washington Irving

There is a doorway that connects two hearts.

There is a good reason why natural water never runs at night.
Africa

There is a path to the top of even the highest mountain.

There is a path to the top of highest mountain.

There is a thin line between love and hate.

There is a time and place for everything.

There is a time when men will not suffer bad things because their ancestors have suffered worse. There is a time when the hoary head of inveterate abuse will neither draw reverence nor obtain protection.
Burke

There is a way from heart to heart.

There is a wise reason why a cock can't sound like a turkey.
Africa

There is always a winner even in a monkey's beauty contest.
Africa

There is always one bull of the kraal.
Africa

There is an exception to every rule.

There is luck in odd numbers.

There is mercy in affliction's smart.
It heals those wounds of sin which mock all human art.
Canter.

There is more than one way to kill a cat.

There is more to life than increasing its speed.
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

There is no action of man in this life which is not the beginning of so long a chain of consequences, as that no human providence is high enough to give us a prospect to the end.
Thomas of Malmesbury

There is no alternative.

There is no answer for, " Get out of my house,"

There is no better mirror than a best friend.
Africa

There is no cake but there is the like of the same make.

There is no day that goes without the moon and no day that goes without sunrise and sunset.
Africa

There is no deceit in a brimmer.

There is no education like adversity.
Bea.

There is no eel so small but it hopes to become a whale.
Ger.

There is no fir tree so small it does not expect to become a cedar.
Ger.

There is no honor among thieves.

There is no medicine to cure hatred.
Africa

There is no need to point out the obvious.
Africa

There is no physician who can cure the disease of love.
Africa

There is no point in living if we cannot take back our culture.
Africa

There is no road to peace; peace is the road.
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

There is no royal road to learning.

There is no set law for attaining success, but the man who would succeed must have a goal set, according to the intensity of his purpose and the effort put forth; on this the extent of his success depends.

There is no smoke without fire.

There is no smoke without fire.
Africa

There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.
Africa

There is no venom like that of the tongue.
Africa

There is no virgin in a maternity ward.
Africa

There is no way you can pour water into a basket and expect the water to remain.
Africa

There is no word or action but may be taken with two hands, - either with the right hand of charitable construction, or the sinister interpretation of malice and suspicion; and all things do succeed as they are taken. To construe an evil action well is but a pleasing and profitable deceit to myself; but to misconstrue a good thing is a treble wrong, - to myself, the action, and the author.
Bishop Hall

There is none that hath turned his shaft, there is none that hath bent his bow.
ANCIENT EGYPT, The Story of Sinuke, Circa 2000 b. c.

There is not enough room for two elephants to sit in the same shade.

There is not enough room for two elephants to sit in the same shade.
Africa

There is not in nature a thing that makes a man so deformed, so beastly, as intemperate anger.
John Webster.

There is nothing humbler than ambition when it is about to climb.
Franklin.

There is nothing new under the sun.

There is nothing so terrible as activity without insight, - says Goethe. "I would open every one of Argus's hundred eyes before I used one of Briareus's hundred hands," says Bacon. "Look before you leap," says John Smith, all over the world.
Whipple

There is nothing so undignified as anger.
H. W. Longfellow, The Spanish Student , act III., sc. 2 (Padre)

There is nothing we receive so reluctantly as advice.
Spectator

There is one rule for industrialists and that is: Make the best quality of goods possible at the lowest cost possible, paying the highest wages possible.
Henry Ford (1863 - 1947)

There is one way by which a strolling player may be ever secure of success; that is, in our theatrical way of expressing it, to make a great deal of the character. To speak and act as in common life is not playing, nor is it what people come to see; natural speaking, like sweet wine, runs glibly over the palate, and scarcely leaves any taste behind it; but being high in a part resembles vinegar, which grates upon the taste, and one feels it while he is drinking.
Goldsmith

There is only eight years between success and failure in politics.

There is reason in the roasting of eggs.

There is safety in numbers.

There is strength in numbers.

There it o'ertook me that I fell down for thirst, I was parched, my throat burned, and I said: "This is the taste of death."
ANCIENT EGYPT, The Story of Sinuke, Circa 2000 b. c.

There may be snow on the mountaintop but there's fire in the valley.

There may be snow on the rooftop but there is fire in the furnace.

There needs a long time to know the worlds pulse.

There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
Alexander Pope

There versus Their versus They're.
en] Confusing Words

There were no ill language if it were not ill taken.

Therefor versus Therefore.
en] Confusing Words

There's a method to his madness.

There's a rotten apple in every barrel.

There's a sucker born every minute.

There's a time and a place for everything.

There's always a bigger fish.

There's always a calm before a storm.

There's always more fish in the sea.

There's an exception to every rule.

There's an R in the month.

There's honour among thieves.

There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle.

There's many a slip between the cup and the lip.

There's many a slip twixt cup and lip.

There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip.

There's many a slip twixt the cup and the lip.

There's method in my madness.

There's more than one way to skin a cat.

There's no Accounting for Taste.

There's no accounting for taste.
la] De gustibus non est disputandum.

There's no accounting for tastes.

There's no companion like the penny.

There's no fool like an old fool.

There's no great banquet but some fare ill.

There's no I in team.

There's no peace for the wicked.

There's no place like home.

There's no point crying over spilt milk.

There's no smoke without fire.

There's no such thing as a free lunch (o. Tanstaafl).

There's no such thing as a free lunch (Tanstaafl).

There's no such thing as a free lunch.

There's no such thing as bad publicity.

There's no time like the present.

There's no use crying over spilt milk.

There's none so blind as those who will not see.

There's none so deaf as those who will not hear.

There's nothing to it.
en] It's very easy.

There's nowt so queer as folk.

There's one (a sucker) born every minute.

There's one born every minute.

There's safety in numbers.

There's the palm-aphis, minute miracle
As wondrous every whit as thou or I.
Robert Browning, Ferishtah's Fancies, 12. A Bean-Stripe

These things surely lie on the knees of the gods.
HOMER, Circa 850 b. c., Odyssey, Book I, Line 267

They agree like bells, they want nothing but hanging.

They agree like cats and dogs.

They agree like harp and harrow.

They agree like pickpockets in a fair.

They agree like the clocks of Lonrdon.

They are the abstract, and brief chronicles of the time.
Shakespeare

They are the only honest hypocrites. Their life is a voluntary dream, a studied madness. The height of their ambition is to be beside themselves. To-day kings, to morrow beggars, it is onlv when they are themselves that they are nothing. Made up of mimic laughter and tears, passing from the extremes of joy or woe at the prompter's call, they wear the livery of other men's fortunes; their very thoughts are not their own.
Hazlitt

They asked the fox, "Who is your witness?" He said, "My tail."

They complain wrongfully on the Sea, who twice suffer shipwrack.

They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance.

They did not find a fault in the rose, they said O! you are red checked.

They laugh at you when your going but when you came back with a load they're a shamed.
Africa

They love too much that die for love.

They must hunger in frost, that will not work in heat.

They steal the hog and give away the feet in alms.

They talk like angels but live like men.
Dr. Johnson.

They talk of Christmas so long, that it comes.

They that sow the wind, shall reap the whirlwind.

They versus Them.
en] Confusing Words

They who dig the wells never drink from them.
Africa

They who love most are least set by.

They who would be young when they are old, must be old when they are young.

They're only after one thing.

Thick and fast.

Thick and thin.

Thick as autumnal leaves or driving sand.
HOMER, Circa 850 b. c., Iliad, Book II, Line 970

Thin air - Vanish into.

Thin On The Ground.

Things hardly attain'd are long retained.

Things that go bump in the night.

Think before you speak.

Think Big.

Think highly of yourself, but not in way of pride, and you will not lower yourself to do anything low, mean and vulgar; keep yoitr self-respect, though you lose everything else, and you will still be rich.

Think Highly of Yourself.

Think like a winner and you will be one.
Africa

Think of all beautiful thoughts, hold your mind right, think of pleasing, uplifting thoughts of beauty, love and kindness, and the reverse enemy thoughts cannot enter and rob your life of sunshine blessings.

Think of ease, but work on.

Think of the going out before you enter.

Think Outside the Box.

Think Tank.

Think twice.
en] Consider something carefully before proceeding.

Thinking cap.

Thinking is the hardest work there is-which is probably the reason why so few engage in it.
Henry Ford (1863 - 1947)

Third Rail.

Third time lucky.

Third time pays for all.

Third time's a charm.

Third time's the charm.

Thirty-Thousand-Foot View.

This Has (Person X) Written All Over It.

This is a pretty flimflam.

This Is Not Your Father's... .

This is too good to be true.
widespread idiom
en] this is so beautiful that one cannot believe it.

This is too nice to be true.
widespread idiom
en] this is so beautiful that one cannot believe it.

This Mortal Coil.

This too shall pass away.

This too shall pass.

This world is a harsh place, this world.
Africa

This world is nothing except it tend to another.

This, too, shall pass.

This, too, shall pass.
Africa

Thorn in the flesh.

Thorns themselves will not harm you -- you hurt yourself on the thorns.
Africa

Those at piece, work for it.
Africa

Those that have get more.

Those that have get.

Those that have, get (more).

Those that have, get more.

Those that have, get.

Those who are absent are always wrong.

Those who are absent are always wrong.
Africa

Those who are opposed to terrorism should not terrorise others.
Africa

Those who arrive to the spring first, drink the purest water.
Africa

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't use their head must use their back.

Those who die in a good cause never fail.

Those who do not forgive break the bridge on which they have to pass.
Africa

Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

Those who get on the same pirogue, have the same aspirations.
Africa

Those who get their kola nut cracked by the spirit should not forget to be humble.
Africa

Those who give birth to nincompoop it's not their wish.
Africa

Those who have friends in the kitchen don't starve.
Africa

Those who have get more.

Those who have get.

Those who have not crossed the river yet should not laugh at those who are drowning.
Africa

Those who have, get (more).

Those who have, get more.

Those who have, get.

Those who judge before they know the facts will learn to shed tears.
Africa

Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones.

Those who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

Those who make friendship with a club shouldn't expect a good handshake.
Africa

Those who master to climb trees with their teeth are in better position to tell which barks are bitter.
Africa

Those who move are the ones who see the lion's footprints.
Africa

Those who never protect the values of their ancestors their soul will never rest peacefully.
Africa

Those who part from there homeland part with there all life.
Africa

Those who respect the elderly pave their own road toward success.
Africa

Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those doing it.

Those who say there are not any opportunities now, are not looking for them.

Those who sleep with dogs will rise with fleas.

Those who think there too big to do little things are perhaps to small to do big things.
Africa

Those who use all their God-given powers for the best, are the greatest men and women in this world.

Those who walk slowly reach a far, hence to hurry is not worth.
Africa

Those who wear pearls do not know how often the shark bites the leg of the diver.
Africa

Those who will not when they may, when they will they shall have nay.

Those whose palm-kernels were cracked for them by a benevolent spirit should not forget to be humble.
Africa

Thou shalt not kill.

Thou will scarce be a man before thy mother.

Though God is almighty, he doesn't send rain from a clear sky.

Though it is the hand that gives, the man must be thanked.
Africa

Though last, not least in love.

Though old and wise be still advised.

Though old and wise yet still advise.

Though the Fox runs, the chicken hath wings.

Though the leopard is fierce, it does not devour its cubs.
Africa

Though the mastiffe be gentle, yet bite him not by the lip.

Though the sky belongs to the bird it can't fly when it's raining.
Africa

Though the Sun shines, leave not your cloak at home.

Though they be clad in silk or scarlet.

Though this be madness, yet there is method in it.

Though this may be play to you,
'Tis death to us.

Thought and theory must preeede all action that moves to salutary purposes. Yet action is nobler in itself than either thought or theory.
Wordsworth

Thought breaks the heart.
Africa

Three helping one another bear the burthen of six.

Three if they unite against a town will ruin it.
Arabian

Three score and ten.

Three Sheets to the Wind.

Three strikes and you are out.

Three things are men most likely to be cheated in, a horse, a wig, and a wife.

Three time's a charm.

Threw versus Through.
en] Confusing Words

Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
Thine own life's means.
Shakespeare

Through others I am somebody.
Africa

Through shouts that hail the shattered banner,
Home from proud onsets led,
Through the glad roar, which greets once more
Each bronzed and bearded head;
Hushed voices from the earth beneath us
Thrill on the summer air,

Through the Grapevine.

Through the roof.
en] Suddenly and excessively high.

Through thick and thin, both over bank and bush.

Through thick and thin, both over Hill and Plain.

Through thick and thin.

Throw a fit.
en] Begin acting like an angry child.

Throw a Wet Blanket on (Something).

Throw a Wrench Into.

Throw caution to the wind.

Throw dirt enough, and some will stick.

Throw Down the Gauntlet.

Throw Elbows.

Throw enough mud at the wall and some of it will stick.

Throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick.

Throw good money after bad.

Throw in the Towel.

Throw Someone for a Loop.

Throw Someone Under the Bus.

Throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Throw the Book at Someone.

Throw The Book At.

Throw the Fight.

Throw the Game.

Throw the Match.

Throw the towel in.

Throw Your Hat Into the Ring.

Thru versus Through.
en] Confusing Words

Thumb Your Nose.

Thumbs up.

Thumbs-Up.

Thunder cannot make a deaf person hear.
Africa

Thursday come, and the week is gone.

Thus far into the bowels of the land.

Ticked off.

Tickle the ivories.

Tickled pink.

Tickled pink.
en] Excited and happy.

Tickled to Death.

Tickling the Ivories.

Tide over.

Tide versus Tied.
en] Confusing Words

Tide You Over.

Tie the knot.

Tie the knot.
en] To get married.

Tighten the Screws.

Tight-Lipped.

Til the cows come home.

Til versus Till.
en] Confusing Words

Till the cows come home.

Tilting at windmills.

Time and money spent in helping men to do more for themselves is far better than mere giving.
Henry Ford (1863 - 1947)

Time and tide tarry for no man.

Time and tide wait for no man.

Time and tide wait for none.

Time and tide.

Time destroys all things.
Africa

Time flies when you're having fun.

Time flies.
la] Latin: Tempus fugit!

Time heals all wounds.

Time heals all wounds.
Africa

Time is a great healer.

Time is a healer.
Africa

Time is a teacher.
Africa

Time is money.

Time is the rider that breaks youth.

Time lost is lost forever.
Africa

Time will tell.

Timing is everything.

Tinker's damn.

Tinkled Pink.

Tip of the Iceberg.

Tip One's Hand.

Tire versus Tyre.
en] Confusing Words

'Tis a stinger.

'Tis as cheap sitting as standing.

Tis better to have loved and lost than to have never loved at all.

'tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all.

'Tis in grain, sir, 'twill endure wind and weather.

'Tis late ere an old man comes to know he is old.

'Tis neither here nor there.

'Tis not the action but the intention that is good or bad.

'Tis not your posterity, but your actions, that will perpetuate your memory.

'Tis safe riding in a good haven.

'Tis the noblest mood
That takes least hold on anger; those faint hearts
That hold least fire are fain to show it first.
A. C. Swinburne, Bothwell , act II., sc. 4 ( Queen Mary)

Tis the Season.

Tissue of lies.

Tit for tat.

Titfer tat.

Titfer.

Tits up.

TLC. (Tender Loving Care).

To a child all weather is cold.

To a crazy ship all winds are contrary.

To a good Spender God is the treasurer.

To a man who only has a hammer in his tool kit, every problem looks like a nail.
Africa

To a T.

To Act Something Out.

To Act Your Age.

To Add Up.

To Air Your Grievances.

To all intents and purposes.

To always fall/land on one's feet.
widespread idiom
en] to adjust oneself to new conditions (after a setback) with unexpected success; to be restored to a sound or stable condition, to experience a fortunate outcome from difficult circumstances unscathed.

To angle with a silver hook.

To answer one in his own language.

To back the wrong horse.
widespread idiom
en] to make an error of judgment, to decide in favor of something that turns out to be the wrong choice later; to give all your support to a person or thing that fails.

To back/to bet on the right horse (cf. German: aufs richtige Pferd setzen).
widespread idiom
en] to judge the situation in the right way; to put all one's trust in the right affair or person.

To be a child of one's times.
widespread idiom
en] to be influenced by the given Zeitgeist; adapt to the latest developments in society.

To be a dead born/still-born child/to be stillborn.
widespread idiom
en] a hopeless matter, an undertaking with no hope for success.

To be a drop of bitterness (in one's cup).
widespread idiom
en] to dampen the joy a little bit.

To be a fig leaf for something.
widespread idiom
en] (to be) a means of concealing or veiling negative facts and events abashedly.

To be A Peach.

To be a real gold mine.
widespread idiom
en] to be a lucrative and inexhaustible source of income, to constantly generate a lot of money; to be a treasure trove, e.g. a source of rich information.

To be able to love other people you must be able to love yourself.
Africa

To be all ears.
widespread idiom
en] to be listening very carefully and with great interest/to be all ears and eyes/to be watching very closely, showing intense interest in listening or hearing about something.

To be all Greek to someone.
widespread idiom
en] to be completely unintelligible for someone, to be beyond comprehension, making no sense at all.

To be an ancestral believer is to be a good ancestor.
Africa

To be angry is to punish myself for another's fault.

To be as meek/gentle as a lamb.
widespread idiom
en] (to be) very meek, kind and gentle.

To be as white as snow.
widespread idiom
en] (to be) very pure and innocent.

To be blue-blooded.
widespread idiom
en] to be an aristocrat; to be born into a royal or aristocratic family, to be noble, socially superior.

To be caught between two fires.
widespread idiom
en] to be confronted by two equally threatening dangers, pressed from two sides simultaneously; to have a dilemma, to be involved in a conflict without the possibility of choosing one of two sides.

To be child's play.
widespread idiom
en] to be an easy and simple task that requires little or no effort; to be easily achieved or done.

To be dead on one's feet/not to be able to stay on one's feet.
widespread idiom
en] to be very exhausted, to be on the point of collapse by tiredness, feebleness etc.

To be firmly in the saddle.
widespread idiom
en] to be in a very secure position, to be in full control; to be superior, in a position of power.

To be frightened of/to fear one's own shadow.
widespread idiom
en] to be extremely nervous or timorous, shy and fearful, to get frightened very easily.

To be great we must think of great things.

To be grist to someone's mill/to bring grist to the mill.
widespread idiom
en] to turn good advantage to someone, to bring profitable business or gain; to help to inspire someone.

To be healthy/cheerful like a fish in the water (German: gesund wie ein Fisch im Wasser).
widespread idiom
en] to be very healthy and cheerful; to be in fine fettle.

To be in the spotlight/to be in the footlight/floodlight (German: im Rampenlicht stehen, cf. English: to be in the limelight).
widespread idiom
en] to be at the center of public attention or to have gained notoriety, especially in the media, due to being famous or having done something important.

To be like a cold shower (on someone).
widespread idiom
en] to be a surprisingly chilly reception, reaction, or response; to be a disappointment to someone.

To be like a douche of cold water (on someone).
widespread idiom
en] to be a surprisingly chilly reception, reaction, or response; to be a disappointment to someone.

To be on pins and needles.
widespread idiom
en] to be very nervous and excited because one is waiting for something to happen, with respect to anxious expectation; to feel most uncomfortable because of one's impatience.

To be on somebody's back.
en] To persistently urge somebody to do (or not to do) something.

To be on the finishing straight.
widespread idiom
en] to come near the winning post, to be just about to reach one's goal successfully after a period of great effort.

To be on the home stretch.
widespread idiom
en] to come near the winning post, to be just about to reach one's goal successfully after a period of great effort.

To be on the same wavelength as someone.
widespread idiom
en] to have similar ideas, interests, and opinions (to another person's); to understand each other very well.

To be one's own master.
widespread idiom
en] to act or think independently, not to be guided by other people.

To be only a cog in the wheel/machine.
widespread idiom
en] to be only one of many entities in a large business, organization, system (in a subordinate position, function, without personal responsibility).

To be or not to be, that is the question.

To be packed (in) like sardines.
widespread idiom
en] (of people) to be pressed tightly together in a small space in a way that is uncomfortable or unpleasant, extremely crowded.

To be poking the fire all alone is a sin,
Och hone! Widow Machree.
Sure the shovel and tongs
To each other belongs,
While the kettle sings songs
Full of family glee!
Yet alone with your cup.
Like a hermit you sup,
Och hone! Widow Machree.
Samuel Lover, Widow Machree

To be precautious doesn't mean fear phobia.
Africa

To be right we must think right, and be ever active in a good cause.

To be sitting on a powder keg.
widespread idiom
en] to be in a very dangerous situation in which something could suddenly go seriously wrong at any time.

To be Smitten With Someone.

To be someone's One and Only.

To be successful go about your work with a cheerful face, facing rough and smooth as you go, with a heart undaunted and you will succeed.

To be the Apple of Someone's Eye.

To be victorious we miut be patient and persevering.

To be/feel like a fish in the water (German: sich wohlfühlen wie ein Fisch im Wasser).
widespread idiom
en] to be in one's preferred environment where one feels comfortable, where one can realize one's abilities.

To Bear Fruit.

To beat one's breast (about something).
widespread idiom
en] to regret something very much; to display one's guilt or remorse publicly; to make a show of grief or sorrow.

To beat one's chest (about something).
widespread idiom
en] to regret something very much; to display one's guilt or remorse publicly; to make a show of grief or sorrow.

To beat others with their own weapons.
widespread idiom
en] to defeat or refute others using the same arguments or methods that they use so that these arguments or methods turn against them.

To become a legend in one's own lifetime.
widespread idiom
en] to have achieved a level of fame and respect and be recognized of it during one's lifetime (rather than posthumously).

To beg breeches of a bare ars't man.

To beggar belief.

To beggar/defy (all) description.
widespread idiom
en] to be so remarkable or appalling that no words can describe it.

To Blackmail Someone into Something.

To Boggle My Mind.

To Boil Something Down.

To boldly go where no man has gone before.

To boot.

To brainwash someone/to give someone a brainwashing.
widespread idiom
en] to aim to destroy a person's basic convictions and attitudes and replace them with an alternative set of fixed beliefs.

To Break Down.

To Break Someone of Something.

To Break the Ice.

To Breeze Along.

To Brew a Plot.

To Bridge the Gap.

To Bring Back to Life.

To Bring Crashing Down.

To Bring Home the Bacon.

To Bring Into Question.

To Bring Into the Fold.

To Bring Someone Down to Earth.

To Bring Someone Down.

To Bring Something Into Focus.

To Bring Something Into Play.

To Bring Something Out of the Woodwork.

To Bring Something to a Standstill.

To bring something to light.
widespread idiom
en] to reveal or disclose something previously hidden or secret; to make something known that others would prefer remained unknown.

To Bring the Best Out of Someone.

To Bring the House Down.

To Bring Them to Their Senses.

To Bring to a Boil.

To Bring to a Halt.

To Bring to a Head.

To Bring to a Heel.

To Bring to Justice.

To Bring to the Fore.

To Bring to Trial.

To Bring Up to Date.

To bring up/out the big guns.
widespread idiom
en] to try to defeat an opponent (in an argument, a debate, a competition, etc.); to make great efforts or give strong counter-arguments in order to achieve something; to bring up the most influential people as opposition.

To Brood About Something.

To Browbeat Someone into Something.

To Brush Aside.

To Brush it Off.

To Brush Over Something.

To Brush Up On Something.

To Bubble Over.

To Buddy Up to Someone.

To Bum Around With.

To burn one's fingers/to get one's fingers burned/burnt.
widespread idiom
en] to harm oneself, to suffer the unpleasant results of something that one has done so that one never wants to do it again.

To Burn Rubber.

To burn the candle at both ends.
widespread idiom
en] to exhaust one's energy recklessly, to allow oneself insufficient rest or sleep, getting up early for work and then working or partying hard, late into the night.

To burst like a bubble.
widespread idiom
en] to suddenly stop being successful and promising of plans, hopes, ideas that looked great in the beginning but turned out to be completely worthless or fake.

To Bury Your Head in the Sand.

To Bury Yourself in Something.

To Bust a Bronco.

To Bust a Gut.

To Bust a Move.

To Bust Ass Out Of Somewhere.

To buy dear is not bounty.

To Buy Into Something.

To Buy Some Time.

To Buy Something Up.

To buy/sell something under the counter.
widespread idiom
en] to buy or sell something secretly, surreptitiously, preferring chosen customers (of things in short supply or an illegal transaction, with the implication that the law is being broken).

To buy/sell something under the table.
widespread idiom
en] to buy or sell something secretly, surreptitiously, preferring chosen customers (of things in short supply or an illegal transaction, with the implication that the law is being broken.

To Buzz Along.

To call something by its name.
widespread idiom
en] to use realistic, proper and truthful language, to give a truthful account of things as they are and make no attempt to spare the feelings of one's audience.

To Care for Someone.

To Carp About Something.

To Carpool.

To Carry A lot of Weight With Someone.

To Carry a Secret to Your Grave.

To Carry a Torch for Someone.

To Carry On.

To Carry the Weight of the World on Your Shoulders.

To Carry Your Cross.

To Carry Your Own Weight.

To Carve Someone Up.

To Cash in on Something.

To cast an eye/one's eyes over something.
widespread idiom
en] to look at something quickly, without looking at details.

To Cast One's Eyes Down.

To Cast One's Lot With.

To cast the first stone.

To Catapult Someone Into Something.

To Catch a Cold.

To Catch a Glimpse.

To Catch Forty Winks.

To Catch Hell About Something.

To Catch On To Something.

To Catch Some Rays.

To Catch Some Z's.

To Catch Someone at a Bad Time.

To Catch Someone by Surprise.

To Catch Someone With One's Pants Down.

To Catch Someone's Eye.

To Catch Your Breath.

To Caution Someone.

To Cave in to Someone.

To Cave in.

To Chase Around.

To Check with Someone.

To Clean Your Clock.

To Coldcock Someone.

To collapse like a house of cards.
widespread idiom
en] (of a plan, idea, organization etc.) to prove to be unrealistic or weak, to have no foundation, to be fragile.

To Collect One's Thoughts.

To come as a (real) bombshell.
widespread idiom
en] to come as a complete surprise or shock, leading to great astonishment (often said of unpleasant news, sudden events, sensations, etc.).

To come at night under the desert moon
On pillars, ghostly porches, temples, towers
Silent for centuries; to see at dawn
The shadow of the Arab on the sand.
John Davidson, The Last Ballad and other Poems: The Ordeal

To come away/to return empty-handed.
widespread idiom
en] to return with nothing to show for one's efforts.

To come in the firing line.
widespread idiom
en] to be strongly criticized for something; to be exposed to violent attacks.

To come in the line of fire.
widespread idiom
en] to be strongly criticized for something; to be exposed to violent attacks.

To Come to Grips.

To Come to Terms.

To come/fall like manna from heaven.
widespread idiom
en] to have fallen to someone without effort.

To commit as many absurdities as a clown in eating an egg.

To Crack a Joke.

To cross the Rubicon.
widespread idiom
en] to make a final irrevocable decision which will have important or fatal consequences.

To cut a long story short.

To cut off the head is no remedy for the headache.
Africa

To cut the evil at the root.
widespread idiom
en] to tackle a bad thing by attacking the causes vigorously.

To cut the Gordian knot.
widespread idiom
en] to solve an intractable problem in an amazingly simple, unexpected, and effective way; to make a quick and courageous decision in order to gain one's ends; to resolve a difficult situation by force.

To cut the umbilical cord.
widespread idiom
en] to gain material and psychological independence (from once strong emotional bonds, to stop needing someone else to look after oneself and start acting independently).

To Die With Your Boots On.

To die/to be dropping like flies/to go down like flies.
widespread idiom
en] to rapidly collapse, die, or drop out in great numbers within a short period of time, usually for the same reason (referring to a group rather than an individual).

To dig a well to put out a house on fire.
Tamil

To dig a well with a needle.
Turk

To dig one's own grave.
widespread idiom
en] to seriously harm oneself, cause one's own ruin or downfall.

To do an evil action is base; to do a good action, without incurring danger, is common enough; but it is the part of a good man to do great and noble deeds, though he risks everything.
Plutarch

To do something behind someone's back.
widespread idiom
en] (to do something) secretly, without the knowledge of another person or in his/her absence.

To Dock Your Pay.

To draw/pick the short straw.
widespread idiom
en] to come off worst, second-best; to be the person chosen to do something difficult or unpleasant.

To drink from a colander.
Latin

To Duck and Weave.

To each his own.

To each his own.
en] Everyone is entitled to personal preferences.

To each, his own.

To Earn Your Keep.

To eat out of someone's hand.
widespread idiom
en] to be very obedient, submissive and compliant (more or less forced), to be manipulated or dominated by another; to do everything they ask.

To err is human.

To err is human; to forgive divine.

To err is human; to forgive, divine.

To escape/to be saved by a hair's breath/hairbreadth.
widespread idiom
en] to escape, to be saved very narrowly, by a tiny distance.

To Everything There is Season.

To fear God is not to sit at ease, but to be ever industrious, for God's work is one eternal round; nature never stands still; cease to act it cease to live.

To Fill You In.

To find a/the common denominator.
widespread idiom
en] to succeed in agreeing on the basic principles; to mutually adapt one's ideas so that unity will be achieved.

To Foot the Bill.

To force an open door.
widespread idiom
en] to stand up for something that is supported anyway.

To forget one's ancestors, is to be a brook without a source, a tree without a root.
Chinese.

To form a dog is the ruin of education.
Africa

To frighten someone to death.
widespread idiom
en] to frighten someone severely.

To frighten the life out of someone.
widespread idiom
en] to frighten someone severely.

To gaze at one's navel/to contemplate one's own navel.
widespread idiom
en] to behave excessively introspectively, to waste time in self-absorption, concentrating on one's own problems or a single issue at the cost of ignoring other important issues.

To get bent out of shape.

To Get Caught Up in Something.

To Get Cold Feet.

To get on someone's nerves.
widespread idiom
en] to annoy or disturb someone constantly; to exasperate someone by the repetition of some irritating action.

To Get Shafted.

To get to the root of evil.
widespread idiom
en] to tackle a bad thing by attacking the causes vigorously.

To gild refined gold, to paint the lily.

To give alms is better than to take alms.
Ger.

To give and keep there is need of wit.

To give someone (the husband) horns/to plant horns on someone.
widespread idiom
en] to cuckold someone (the husband).

To give someone the green light.
widespread idiom
en] to encourage or allow someone to proceed, to give someone permission to do something that they were planning to do or have asked to do.

To go one's own way.
widespread idiom
en] to become completely independent and self-reliant; to concentrate on one's own life and not interfere with other people's affairs.

To go to Canossa.
widespread idiom
en] to humble oneself before an opponent or enemy, especially because of having a request that is felt to be self-effacing.

To Grow Accustomed To.

To guess is cheap, to guess wrong is expensive.
Africa

To handle yourself use your head to handle others use your heart.
Africa

To hang on the lips of someone/to hang upon someone's lips.
widespread idiom
en] to listen to sb. attentively, to listen eagerly to every word a person is saying or eagerly await their word or command.

To hang one's head.
widespread idiom
en] to be very discouraged; to be dejected, despondent, melancholy.

To Have a Chip on One's Shoulder.

To have a heart of gold.
widespread idiom
en] to be extremely kind and helpful, to be of a generous and noble nature.

To have a score to settle with someone/to pay off an old score.
widespread idiom
en] to pay something back for someone which dates back a long time; to get revenge on someone for some grievance, to requite.

To have a sixth sense (for something).
widespread idiom
en] to have a supernatural sense, a special intuition in addition to the five senses.

To have an ace up one's sleeve.
widespread idiom
en] to find a surprising solution to a problem.

To Have Butterflies In Your Stomach.

To have great reverence for God, we must know more of his handy work.

To have more luck than brains.
widespread idiom
en] to have incredible good luck.

To Have One For the Road.

To have one's back against the wall.
widespread idiom
en] to be in great distress, to be in a defensive or desperate situation without any way of escape; to have serious problems.

To have seen better days.
widespread idiom
en] to have fallen into a state of decline, to be worn out (said of things that are not valuable any more).

To have the last word (on something).
widespread idiom
en] to make the last statement in a discussion or argument; to speak as the last one, the one who makes the final decision about something.

To Head Up Something.

To hear something straight from the horse's mouth.

To Hedge Your Bets.

To Hem and Haw.

To him that hath lost his tast, sweet is sowre.

To him that wills, ways are not wanting.

To Hit it Off.

To hit someone in the eye/to fall/leap into someone's eyes.
widespread idiom
en] to be so obvious as to be noticed by people.

To hit the nail on the head.
widespread idiom
en] to find the right answer to a problem in a few words or describe something in exactly the right way; to find the optimal solution to a problem.

To hold a knife to the throat of someone.
widespread idiom
en] to exert great pressure on someone, to ultimately force someone to act or to make a decision.

To hold/put a gun to someone's head.
widespread idiom
en] to exert great pressure on someone, to ultimately force someone to act or to make a decision.

To hold/put a pistol to someone's head.
widespread idiom
en] to exert great pressure on someone, to ultimately force someone to act or to make a decision.

To keep one's gunpowder dry.
widespread idiom
en] to hold oneself ready for an action in case the need arises, to be ready to fight back or to defend one's position at all times; to not prematurely consume one's forces.

To keep one's head above water.
widespread idiom
en] to stay out of trouble, especially out of financial difficulties, to keep away from insolvency; to efficiently fight for survival, to avoid being overwhelmed by one's tasks or commitments.

To keep one's powder dry.
widespread idiom
en] to hold oneself ready for an action in case the need arises, to be ready to fight back or to defend one's position at all times; to not prematurely consume one's forces.

To kick up dust.
widespread idiom
en] to cause disturbance, to make trouble.

To kill time.
widespread idiom
en] to do something which is not very useful or interesting while you are waiting for time to pass.

To know how the wind is blowing/to know which way the wind is blowing.
widespread idiom
en] to know what is going on; to understand the real causes, to be well aware of how a situation is developing and to use this in deciding what to do.

To know the road ahead ask those coming back.

To launder (black/dirty) money (into white).
widespread idiom
en] to make illegal money legal; to reinvest money from illegal activities in a legal activity to hide the existence of trafficking.

To Lead Someone On.

To leave a lot to be desired.
en] To be unsatisfactory.

To let off/blow off steam.
widespread idiom
en] to abreact, work off one's anger, tension or frustrations; to get rid of pent-up energy or emotion.

To Let Someone Down.

To let someone stew in his/her own juice.
widespread idiom
en] to let someone worry about something, especially something they have done wrong, without doing anything to help them.

To lick one's wounds.
widespread idiom
en] to feel sorry for oneself after being thoroughly defeated or humiliated; to recuperate from injuries or hurt feelings.

To Long versus Too Long.
en] Confusing Words

To look like a walking corpse.
widespread idiom
en] to look very pale and miserable; to be utterly exhausted, to feel ghastly.

To Look the Part.

To lose (one's) face.
widespread idiom
en] to be embarrassed or humiliated, especially publicly; to do something which makes other people stop respecting you/to save (one's) face/to avoid humiliation or embarrassment, to preserve dignity; to do something so that people will continue to respect you.

To lose one's head.
widespread idiom
en] to lose one's power of reasoning, to become so excited or confused that one behaves irrationally.

To lose/miss the thread (of)/to lose one's thread.
widespread idiom
en] to get confused or forget what one wants to say, especially if it is long and complicated.

To love a king is not bad, but a king who loves you is better.
Africa

To love someone who does not love you, is like shaking a tree to make the dew drops fall.

To love someone who does not love you, is like shaking a tree to make the dew drops fall.
Africa

To love that one who never loves you is like rain falling in the forest.
Africa

To make a good face to the bad game (German: gute Miene zum bösen Spiel machen, cf. English: to put a good face on it).
widespread idiom
en] to act as if something unpleasant or upsetting is not as bad as it really is; not to show one's annoyance; to overlook something or accept it willingly or not.

To Make A Long Story Short.

To make matters worse.

To make someone's mouth water.
widespread idiom
en] to whet someone's appetite for something; to cause someone to eagerly anticipate or long for something (that is very attractive or appealing).

To measure with two measures (German: mit zweierlei Maß messen).
widespread idiom
en] to apply different sets of standards and thus judge unjustly.

To melt like butter (in the sun).
widespread idiom
en] to be fading away, to dwindle away within a short time, to be used up quickly.

To melt like snow in the sun.
widespread idiom
en] to be fading away, to dwindle away within a short time, to be used up quickly.

To neglect one's ancestors would bring ill-fortune and failure in life.
Africa

To one who does not know , a small garden is a forest.
Africa

To overshoot the mark.
widespread idiom
en] to act with excessive zeal, to do something to a greater extent than is necessary or desirable; to go beyond what is acceptable.

To paint a black picture of someone/something.
widespread idiom
en] to describe someone or something in an extremely negative way.

To paint the devil on the wall (as he will appear).
widespread idiom
en] to think the worst and to evoke a disaster.

To pat someone on the back.
widespread idiom
en] to make a gesture of encouragement, appreciation, condescension, etc; to congratulate or praise someone.

To Pay an Arm and a Leg.

To pay someone in their own coin/to pay back in the same coin.
widespread idiom
en] to treat someone in the same way that he or she has treated others, usually harshly or unjustly; to retaliate by using the same method.

To Peter Out.

To Pitch a Fit.

To Pitch In.

To play (the) devil's advocate.
widespread idiom
en] to pretend to argue against an idea or plan supported by the majority of people in order to make them discuss it in more detail and help determine its validity; to present a hypothetical argument to a suggestion that challenges the view one actually holds.

To play a role (for someone/something).
widespread idiom
en] to be of some importance (for someone/something); to be involved (in something), to have a specific effect (on someone/something).

To play comedy (to someone) (German: Theater/Komödie spielen (vor jmdm.); cf. English: to play-act/to put on an act).
widespread idiom
en] to fool, cheat, and mislead someone, to try to deceive someone by acting out a farce to him/her; to behave in a deliberately silly or playful way.

To play no role (for someone/something).
widespread idiom
en] to be of no importance (for someone/something); not to be involved (in something), to have no specific effect (on someone/something).

To play one's last card.
widespread idiom
en] to use one's last chance or advantage (at the most opportune moment); to exploit an advantageous position; to use the last means to try to reach a goal.

To play one's last trump/trump card.
widespread idiom
en] to use one's last chance or advantage (at the most opportune moment); to exploit an advantageous position; to use the last means to try to reach a goal.

To play Russian roulette.
widespread idiom
en] to take big risks, in a way that is very dangerous; to take a dangerous or foolish chance.

To play the first fiddle to someone/something.
widespread idiom
en] to be the most important person, to dominate, be superior to someone or something else/to play the second fiddle to someone/something/to play a subsidiary role to someone or something else; to take a subordinate part (but next of the leader).

To play the same old record.
widespread idiom
en] to repeat things constantly, to continue to express the same ideas or opinions that one has expressed before; to complain constantly about the same thing.

To play theater (to someone) (German: Theater/Komödie spielen (vor jmdm.); cf. English: to play-act/to put on an act).
widespread idiom
en] to fool, cheat, and mislead someone, to try to deceive someone by acting out a farce to him/her; to behave in a deliberately silly or playful way.

To point the finger/an accusing finger at someone.
widespread idiom
en] to blame someone for a mistake or blunder they have made.

To Poke Fun At.

To Poke the Bear.

To poke/thrust/stick one's nose into something/everything.
widespread idiom
en] to meddle in other persons' affairs; to take an inquisitive interest in something and become absorbed in it.

To Pop (one's) Cherry.

To Pop Off.

To prescribe physic for the dead and advice to the old is the same thing.
Diogenes

To promise and give nothing is a comfort to a fool.

To Pull Someone's Leg.

To pull something by the hairs.
widespread idiom
en] to refer to something, e.g. an argument, which is far-fetched, beside the point.

To Put a Sock in It.

To put all one's eggs in/into one basket.
widespread idiom
en] to stake everything on one chance, to invest all one's money in one thing, without spreading one's risks.

To put down roots/to strike/take root.
widespread idiom
en] to settle somewhere, to become securely or permanently established; to show that one wants to stay in a (new) place.

To put someone/something in the shade.
widespread idiom
en] to be so impressive that they make the other person or thing seem unimportant by comparison; to surpass someone's success, to surpass the quality of something.

To put something on ice.
widespread idiom
en] to defer a project, plan, etc. for the time being while preserving it for future use.

To put/paint things in (crude) black and white.
widespread idiom
en] to estimate everything as being either positive or negative; to have a simple and very certain opinion about something.

To read between the lines.
widespread idiom
en] to understand or deduce the real meaning of something; to perceive a hidden message or additional information, even though it is not stated explicitly.

To recharge one's batteries.
widespread idiom
en] to regain one's energy after working hard for a long time; to have a long rest or a holiday so that you feel better.

To reckon without one's host.
widespread idiom
en] to resolve an issue only from one's own standpoint; to fail with something because one acted without considering what another person might do or decide.

To reinvent the wheel.
widespread idiom
en] to waste time and effort in creating something that already exists or redoing work when it has already been done satisfactorily; to rethink an already working system, method, etc. that has long been accepted and even taken for granted.

To remove a fly from a friend's forehead never use a hatchet.
Africa

To resist him that is set in authority is evil.
ANCIENT EGYPT, The Instruction of Ptahkotep, Circa 2675 b. c.

To rest on one's laurels.
widespread idiom
en] to live off one's reputation; to become complacent or uninspired in the wake of previous success or achievements, especially as a way of refraining from further effort, avoiding the work needed to advance one's status.

To rise with the lark, and go to bed with the lamb.

To roll back the wheel of history.
widespread idiom
en] to restore former conditions, to reverse historical trends, undo historical developments.

To roll up one's sleeves.
widespread idiom
en] to be ready and willing to set about hard work; to prepare oneself for a difficult task.

To rub one's hands.
widespread idiom
en] to feel or express pleased anticipation or self-satisfaction; to show eager expectation of something pleasant or interesting.

To rub salt in/into the wound.
widespread idiom
en] to intentionally increase someone's pain or shame; to make a difficult situation even worse for someone.

To rule with an iron fist.
widespread idiom
en] to rule with unrelenting severity; to control a group of people very firmly, having complete power over everything that they do.

To rule with an iron hand.
widespread idiom
en] to rule with unrelenting severity; to control a group of people very firmly, having complete power over everything that they do.

To Run a Tight Ship.

To Run Hot and Cold.

To save one's own skin.
widespread idiom
en] to protect oneself from danger or difficulties, without worrying about other people.

To score an own goal.
widespread idiom
en] to misjudge a future outcome and harm one's own interests by means of a thoughtless action; to try to get an advantage by doing something while actually making the situation worse; to do something that causes self-inflicted damage.

To see the light at the end of the tunnel.
widespread idiom
en] to have an indication that a long period of hardship or adversity is nearing its end; to gain hope for the future and for the end of a difficult or unpleasant situation.

To see the light/to see the light of day.
widespread idiom
en] 1. to be brought out, published (said of writing, literature, music, etc.)
2. to be discovered, to become well-known;
3. to be born.

To see/look through rose-colored glasses.
widespread idiom
en] to take a too optimistic and therefore unrealistic view on something; to think of only the good parts of a situation and pretend that the bad parts do not exist.

To set the mind above the appetites is the end of abstinence, which one the fathers observes to be, not a virtue, but the groundwork of a virtue. By forbearing to do what may innocently be done, we may add hourly new vigor to resolution, and secure the power of resistance when pleasure or interest shall lend their charms to guilt.
Johnson

To set the tone of/for something.
widespread idiom
en] to have the greatest say, to determine what will happen or what the norms or rules within a given group are.

To shoot up/spring up like mushrooms.
widespread idiom
en] to grow rapidly; to suddenly come into existence in great numbers.

To shut/slam the door in someone's face.
widespread idiom
en] to reject someone harshly, to terminate any further negotiations.

To sing the same (old) song.
widespread idiom
en] to repeat things constantly, to continue to express the same ideas or opinions that one has expressed before; to complain constantly about the same thing.

To sing the same (old) tune.
widespread idiom
en] to repeat things constantly, to continue to express the same ideas or opinions that they have expressed before; to complain constantly about the same thing.

To Sleep On It.

To Sleep, Perhaps to Drea.

To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub.

To slip on a banana skin.
widespread idiom
en] to make a small error which is likely to cause embarrassing problems to oneself.

To speak ill of anyone is to speak ill of yourself.

To stand on firm ground.
widespread idiom
en] to have a stable position, to be sure about one's beliefs, knowledge, etc.; to regain firm ground again (economically etc.).

To stand on one's own (two) feet.
widespread idiom
en] to act or behave independently, to be self reliant, in an economic or emotional sense.

To stand with both feet on the ground.
widespread idiom
en] to have a sensible and practical attitude to life; to be able to cope with life.

To stand with both legs on the ground.
widespread idiom
en] to have a sensible and practical attitude to life; to be able to cope with life.

To Steal Someone's Thunder.

To succeed in life is never to suppose you will not meet failures.

To Suck Up to Someone.

To suffer doesn't mean to die.
Africa

To sugar/sweeten the pill/to gild the pill for someone.
widespread idiom
en] to try to make bad news or an unpleasant situation more acceptable for someone by telling them something pleasant at the same time.

To swallow the/a bitter pill/to be a bitter pill to swallow.
widespread idiom
en] to have to accept a difficult or unpleasant fact or situation.

To swim a river with a bridge close by.

To take ambition from a soldier is to rob him of his spurs.

To take off one's hat to someone.
widespread idiom
en] to have great respect for someone and express one's admiration for what he or she has done.

To take something for pure coin (German: etwas für bare Münze nehmen, cf. English: to take something at face value).
widespread idiom
en] to take something (especially something that was said) for granted or without criticism even though it was not meant seriously.

To take something into one's head.
widespread idiom
en] to resolve to do something, usually something considered to be foolish or uncharacteristic.

To take the nuts from the fire with the dog's foot.

To take the reins.
widespread idiom
en] to take on the leading position; to keep things firmly under control, to provide proof of one's authority by exercise of power.

To take the wind out of someone's sails.
widespread idiom
en] to compromise the force or effectiveness of a person's words or actions by anticipating them in some way; to deprive someone of an advantage.

To take/follow the line of least resistance.
widespread idiom
en] to chose the easiest but not necessary the best way to do something, to avoid opposition of any kind and to submit to other people's demands.

To Talk Shop.

To talk to a brick wall.
widespread idiom
en] not to be heard with advice, warnings, etc., not to achieve anything by means of talking to someone who refuses any advice or discussion.

To talk to a wall.
widespread idiom
en] not to be heard with advice, warnings, etc., not to achieve anything by means of talking to someone who refuses any advice or discussion.

To talk to someone between four eyes (cf. German: unter vier Augen (mit jemandem sprechen).
widespread idiom
en] to talk to someone in private, without the presence of other people.

To Talk Turkey.

To tell someone something (straight) to their face.
widespread idiom
en] to tell someone something ruthlessly, without any inhibition.

To the dog straw and to the ass bones.
M. Greek

To the Ends of the Earth.

To the last breath.
widespread idiom
en] until the end.

To the Letter.

To the manner born.

To the nines.

To the nth degree.

To the victor go the spoils.

To the Victor Goes the Spoils.

To thine own self be true.

To throw (in/up) the sponge.
widespread idiom
en] to give up or lose all hope, especially in a challenging or conflict situation; to abandon a plan or idea because it has been too difficult.

To throw down the gauntlet.
widespread idiom
en] to do or say something that challenges someone to a contest; to take action or to compete against someone; to declare war/to pick up/take up the gauntlet/to accept the challenge.

To throw in the towel.
widespread idiom
en] to give up or lose all hope, especially in a challenging or conflict situation; to abandon a plan or idea because it has been too difficult.

To throw oil on the fire.
Dutch.

To throw pearls before swine.

To tighten one's belt.
widespread idiom
en] to make economies, live frugally and use less resources when food or money is scare; to start in earnest on an activity.

To touch the/put one's finger on the sore point.
widespread idiom
en] to refer to a particularly sensitive matter that will upset someone; to speak about reality, even if it is hard.

To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive.

To travel is to see, to return is to talk.
Africa

To treat/handle someone/something with kid gloves.
widespread idiom
en] to treat someone with the utmost gentleness and care, so as not to cause offence; to handle a situation or an object delicately and gingerly.

To trouble me is better than to forget me.
Africa

To try and fail is not laziness.
Africa

To try and to fail is not laziness.
Africa

To Turn a Blind Eye to.

To turn one's back on someone/something.
widespread idiom
en] to turn away from someone, something; to refuse to help someone; to stop being involved in something' to forsake or abandon someone/something.

To twiddle one's thumbs.
widespread idiom
en] to be bored, to be idle, to have nothing to do.

To twist a rope of sand.

To versus Too versus Two.
en] Confusing Words

To vote with one's feet.
widespread idiom
en] to indicate an opinion by being present or absent; to show one's disapproval by walking out, departing or emigrating.

To wade in marshes and sea margins is the destiny of certain birds, and they are so accurately made for this that they are imprisoned in those places. Each animal out of its habitat would starve. To the physician, each man, each woman, is an amplification of one organ. A soldier, a locksmith, a bank-clerk, and a dancer could not exchange functions. And thus we are victims of adaptation.
Emerson

To wash one's dirty linen in public.
widespread idiom
en] to reveal something discreditable that should be kept private; to expose private matters to public view, especially unsavory secrets.

To wear blinkers/blinders/to have blinkers/blinders on one's eyes.
widespread idiom
en] to have a limited viewpoint, to be narrow-minded; not to want to see reality as it is.

To welcome/greet someone with open arms.
widespread idiom
en] to accept, greet someone with great willingness; to show that one is very happy to see or meet someone or to have them as part of their group etc.

To whom to much is given we require too much from him.
Africa

To wo is a pleasure in a young man, a fault in an old.

To wrap oneself in silence.
widespread idiom
en] to take refuge in silence, to say nothing.

Toast of the town.

Today is a good day to die.

To-day the many-hued anemone,
Waving, expands within the rock-pools green,
And swift transparent creatures of the sea
Dart through the feathery sea-fronds, scarcely seen.
Sir Lewis Morris, Harvest-Tide: Lydstep Caverns

Toe the Line.

Toe-curling.

Toffee-nosed.

Toil, feel, think, hope. A man is sure to dream enough before he dies without making arrangements for the purpose.
Sterling

Tolerance does not mean I approve what I tolerate.
Mahatma Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

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