encyclopaedia

academia

† ăcădēmī̆a, ae, f., = ἀκαδήμεια, and less correctly ἀκαδημία,

I. the Academy, a gymnasium about six stadia from Athens, named after the hero Academos or Echedemos (cf. Plut. Thes. 31), celebrated as the place where Plato taught; whence his scholars were called Academici, and his doctrine Philosophia Academica, in distinction from Stoica, Cynica, etc., Cic. de Or. 1, 21, 98; id. Or. 3, 12; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1 al.
II. Meton.
A. For The philosophy of the Academy: instaret academia, quae quidquid dixisses, id te ipsum scire negaret, Cic. de Or. 1, 10, 43; id. Off. 3, 4, 20 al.: Academia vetus, id. Ac. 1, 4, 18; id. Fin. 5, 8, 21: recens, id. Leg. 1, 13, 39; cf. recentior, id. de Or. 3, 18, 68; and adulescentior, id. Fam. 9, 8, 1: nova, id. Ac. 1, 12, 46 al.
B. Cicero, as a partisan of the Academic philosophy, named his estate, on the way from Lake Avernus to Puteoli, Academia; there also he wrote the Academica. He had another Academia at his Tusculan Villa, Cic. Tusc. 2, 3; 3, 3; id. Att. 1, 4, 3 al. (The i long, Cic. Div. 1, 13, 22; Tull. Laurea ap. Plin. 31, 2, 3, § 8; short, Claud. de Cons. Mall. Theod. 94; Sid. 15, 120.)

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