dictum
WORDS OF WISDOM

English


  • Have not too low thoughts of thyself. The confidence a man hath of his being pleasant in his demeanor is a means whereby he infallibly cometh to be such.
    Burton
  • Have not your cloak to make when it begins to rain.
  • Have patience and endure; this unhappiness will one day be beneficial.
    Ovid
  • Have patience awhile; slanders are not long-lived. Truth is the child of Time; erelong she shall appear to vindicate thee.
    Kant
  • Have spent my peaceful days, and shared my crust
    With her who would have cheer'd me, rather far
    Than on this throne; but being what I am,
    I'll be it nobly.
    Joanna Baillie
  • Have the courage to be ignorant of a great number of things, in order to avoid the calamity of being ignorant of everything.
  • Have the French for friends, but not for neighbours.
  • Have the guts.
    Have courage
  • Have the pleasure of seeing an ass ride on horseback.
    Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Confessions
  • Have yee him on the hip.
    John Heywood, (1497??1580?), Proverbes. Part ii. Chap. v.
  • Have yee him on the hip?
    Heywood
  • Have yee him on the hip?
    John Heywood
  • Have you ever found any who have been dissatisfied with dying?.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • Have you ever rightly considered what the mere ability to read means? That it is the key which admits us to the whole world of thought and fancy and imagination? to the company of saint and sage, of the wisest and the wittiest at their wisest and wittiest moment? That it enables us to see with the keenest eyes, hear with the finest ears, and listen to the sweetest voices of all time? More than that, it annihilates time and space for us.
    Lowell
  • Have you found your life distasteful?
    My life did, and does, smack sweet.
    Was your youth of pleasure wasteful?
    Mine I saved and hold complete.
    Do your joys with age diminish?
    When mine fail me I'll complain.
    Must in death your daylight finish?
    My sun sets to rise again.
    Robert Browning
  • Have you known how to compose your manners? You have done a great deal more than he who has composed books. Have you known how to take repose? You have done more than he who has taken cities and empires.
    Montaigne
  • Have you not heard it said full oft,
    A woman's nay doth stand for nought?
    Shakespeare
  • Have you not love enough to bear with me, when that rash humor which my mother gave me makes me forgetful.
    Shakespeare
  • Have you not observed that faith is generally strongest in those whose character may be called the weakest?
    Madame de StaŽl
  • Have you not observed that there is a lower kind of discretion and regularity, which seldom fails of raising men to the highest station in the court, the church, and the law?
    Swift
  • Have you so much leisure from your own business that you can take care of other people's that does not at all belong to you?
    Terence
  • Have you summoned your wits from wool-gathering?
    Middleton
  • Having a good wife and rich cabbage soup, seek not other things.
  • Having an only child is like having one eye.
    Yiddish] Ain kind iz azoi vi ain oig.
  • Having made an expiation for sins, He is set down on God's right hand forever. There is no more that even Immanuel can do. This is Love's extremest effort, God's last and greatest gift, God's own sacrifice. Can there be any escape for those who neglect so great salvation?
    James Hamilton
  • Having mourned your sin, for outward Eden lost, find paradise within.
    Dryden
  • Having no business of his own to attend to, he busies himself with the affairs of others.
    Horace
  • Having too good an opinion of our own worth.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • Hawks will not pick out Hawk's eyes.
  • Hawks will not pick out hawks' eyes.

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