dictum
WORDS OF WISDOM

English


  • 'Tis certain that worship stands in some commanding relation to the health of man, and to his highest powers, so as to be, in some manner, the source of intellect.
    Emerson
  • 'Tis death to me to be at enmity;
    I hate it, and desire all good men's love.
    Shakespeare
  • 'Tis deeds must win the prize.
    Shakespeare
  • 'Tis done! dread winter spreads his latest glooms, and reigns tremendous o'er the conquered year.
    Thomson
  • 'Tis easier for the generous to forgive,
    Than for offence to ask it.
    Thomson
  • 'Tis easier to build two chimneys, then to maintaine one.
    George Herbert, Jacula Prudentum
  • 'Tis education forms the common mind,
    Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined.
    Pope
  • 'Tis ever thus
    With noble minds, if chance they slide to folly;
    Remorse stings deeper, and relentless conscience
    Pours more gall into the bitter cup
    Of their severe repentance.
    Mason
  • 'Tis from high life high characters drawn;
    A saint in crape is twice a saint in lawn.
    POPE: Moral Essays, Epis. i., Line 135.
  • 'Tis God gives skill,
    But not without men's hands: He could not make
    Antonio Stradivari's violins
    Without Antonio.
    George Eliot
  • 'Tis godlike to have power, but not to kill.
    Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher
  • 'Tis good for men to love their present pains
    Upon example; so the spirit is eased.
    Shakespeare
  • 'Tis good nature only wins the heart;
    It moulds the body to an easy grace
    And brightens every feature of the face;
    It smoothes th' unpolish'd tongue with eloquence
    And adds persuasion to the finest sense.
    Stillingfleet
  • 'Tis goodwill makes intelligence.
    Emerson
  • 'Tis government that makes them seem divine.
    Shakespeare
  • 'Tis great, 'tis manly, to disdain disguise;
    It shows our spirit, or it proves our strength.
    Young
  • 'Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours,
    And ask them what report they've borne to heaven,
    And how they might have borne more welcome news,
    Their answers form what men experience call;
    If wisdom's friend, her best; if not, worst foe.
    Young
  • 'Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours.
    Young
  • 'Tis hard to be wretched, but worse to be knowne so.
    George Herbert, Jacula Prudentum
  • 'Tis hard to find God, but to comprehend
    Him, as He is, is labour without end.
    Herrick
  • 'Tis hard to say if greater want of skill
    Appear in writing or in judging ill;
    But, of the two less dang'rous is th' offence
    To tire our patience than mislead our sense.
    Pope
  • 'Tis he, I ken the manner of his gait;
    He rises on the toe; that spirit of his
    In aspiration lifts him from the earth.
    SHAKESPEARE: Troil. and Cress., Act iv., Sc. 5.
  • 'Tis heaven alone that is given away,
    'Tis only God may be had for the asking.
    Lowell
  • 'Tis heaven alone that is given away; 'tis only God may be had for the asking.
    Lowell
  • 'Tis held that sorrow makes us wise.
    Tennyson
  • 'Tis impious in a good man to be sad.
    Young
  • 'Tis impotent to grieve for what is past, and unavailing to exclaim.
    Havard
  • 'Tis in grain, sir, 'twill endure wind and weather.
  • 'Tis in my memory lock'd,
    And you yourself shall keep the key of it.
    Shakespeare
  • 'Tis late before the brave despair.
    Thomson

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