dictum
WORDS OF WISDOM

English


  • 'Tis more brave
    To live, than to die.
    OWEN MEREDITH: Lucile, Pt. ii., Canto vi., St. 11.
  • 'Tis more laudable to obey the bad than the good.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis neither here nor there.
  • 'Tis no matter; it may be of use to some others.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis not in mortals to command success,
    But we'll do more, Sempronius; we'll deserve it.
    Addison
  • 'Tis not my talent to conceal my thoughts,
    Or carry smiles and sunshine in my face,
    When discontent sits heavy at my heart.
    Addison
  • 'Tis not now who's stout and bold?
    But who bears hunger best, and cold?
    And he's approv'd the most deserving,
    Who longest can hold out at starving.
    Butler
  • 'Tis not the cause, but their interest, that inflames them.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis not the number of men, but the number of good men.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis not what man Does which exalts him, but what man Would do.
    Robert Browning
  • 'Tis of the tears which stars weep, sweet with joy.
    Bailey
  • 'Tis pity wine should be so deleterious,
    For tea and coffee leave us much more serious.
    Byron
  • 'Tis pleasant purchasing our fellow-creatures;
    And all are to be sold, if you consider
    Their passions, and are dext'rous; some by features
    Are bought up, others by a warlike leader;
    Some by a place - as tend their years of natures;
    The most by ready cash - but all have prices,
    From crowns to kicks, according to their vices.
    Byron
  • 'Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print;
    A book's a book, although there's nothing in 't.
    Byron
  • 'Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print;
    A book's a book, although there's nothing in 't.
    English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, LORD BYRON.
  • 'Tis pleasing to be school'd in a strange tongue
    By female lips and eyes - that is, I mean,
    When both the teacher and the taught are young,
    As was the case, at least, where I have been;
    They smile so when one's right; and when one's wrong
    They smile still more.
    Byron
  • 'Tis pride, rank pride, and haughtiness of soul: I think the Romans call it stoicism.
    Addison
  • 'Tis said of Epimenides, that he always prophesied backward.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis said that absence conquers love;
    But oh believe it not!
    I've tried, alas! its power to prove,
    But thou art not forgot.
    FREDERICK W. THOMAS: Absence Conquers Love.
  • 'Tis said the lion will turn and flee
    From a maid in the pride of her purity.
    Byron
  • 'Tis so I melt and steal away from myself.
    Michel De Montaigne
  • 'Tis strange how some men's tempers suit,
    Like bawd and brandy, with dispute,
    That for their own opinions stand fast,
    Only to have them claw'd and canvass'd.
    Butler
  • 'Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark
    Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home;
    'Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark
    Our coming, and look brighter when we come.
    Byron
  • 'Tis sweet to hear the watchdog's honest bark bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home.
    Byron
  • 'Tis sweet to hear
    At midnight, on the blue and moonlight deep,
    The song and oar of Adria's gondolier,
    By distance mellow'd, o'er the waters sweep;
    'Tis sweet to see the evening star appear;
    'Tis sweet to listen as the night winds creep
    From leaf to leaf; 'tis sweet to view on high
    The rainbow, based on ocean, span the sky.
    Sweet is the vintage, when the showering grapes
    In Bacchanal profusion reel to earth,
    Purple and gushing; sweet are our escapes
    From civic revelry to rural mirth;
    Sweet to the miser are his glittering heaps;
    Sweet to the father is his first born's birth;
    Sweet is revenge - especially to women,
    Pillage to soldiers, prize-money to seamen.

    'Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark
    Bay deep-mouth'd welcome as we draw near home:
    'Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark
    Our coming, and look brighter when we come:
    'Tis sweet to be awaken'd by the lark,
    Or lull'd by falling waters; sweet the hum
    Of bees, the voice of girls, the song of birds,
    The lisp of children and their earliest words.
    Byron
  • 'Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark our coming, and look brighter when we come.
    Byron
  • 'Tis sweet to listen as the night winds creep
    From leaf to leaf; 'tis sweet to view on high
    The rainbow, based on ocean, span the sky.
    Byron
  • 'Tis the beginning of hell in this life, and a passion not to be excused. Every other sin hath some pleasure annexed to it, or will admit of an excuse: envy alone wants both.
    Burton
  • 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us;
    'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter,
    And intimates eternity to man.
    Addison
  • 'Tis the sharpness of our mind that gives the edge to our pains.
    Michel De Montaigne

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